OceansArt.US

Google
 
Web www.OceansArt.US
| Home | About Us | Site Map | Contact Us | Prints | Licensing | Delivery©2011 OceansArt.US

Free Photos of Kayaks.

Ever think where this name came from?  How was this first used?

Kayaks (Inuktitut: qajaq) were originally developed by indigenous people living in the Arctic regions, who used the boats to hunt on inland lakes, rivers and the coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic, Bering Sea and North Pacific oceans. These first kayaks were constructed from stitched animal skins such as seal stretched over a wooden frame made from collected driftwood. Kayaks have been used for at least 4000 years .


The word "kayak" means "man's boat" or "hunter's boat", and native kayaks were a very personal craft, built by the man who would use them (with assistance from his wife, who would sew the skins) fitting his measures, for maximum maneuverability. A special skin jacket, Tuilik, was then laced the kayak, creaing a waterproof seal. This made the eskimo roll the preferred method of regaining posture after a capsize. The builder used found materials and anthropomorphic measurements, using his own body, to create a kayak conforming closely to his own body. For example - typically the length was three times the span of his outstretched arms. The width at the cockpit was the width of the builder's hips plus two fists (and sometimes less). The typical depth was his fist plus the outstretched thumb (hitch hiker).


Most of the Eskimo peoples from the Aleutian Island eastward to Greenland relied on the kayak for hunting a variety of prey — primarily seals, though whales and caribou were important in some areas. Skin on frame kayaks are still being used for hunting by Inuit people in Greenland. In other parts of the world homebuilders are continuing the tradition of skin on frame kayaks albeit with modern skins of canvas or synthetic fabric. Contemporary kayaks trace their origins primarily to the native boats of Alaska, northern Canada, and Southwest Greenland. (Source: Wikipedia)

See all the free photos: Photo Catalog.  Click on the picture for a FREE larger version. Read the licensing rules for your needs. There are hundreds of high quality free photos: use the Google/site search engine. See our digital photography tips : DOs and Don'tsChoosing a Camera and Accessories , Downloading Photos, and Editing Photos. See our digital photography tips : DOs and Don'tsChoosing a Camera and Accessories , Downloading Photos, and Editing Photos.

Visit TechnologySite.org for free photos and lists of inventions and technology and learn Climate Change Facts to see if you are at risk from global warming.  

kayak01.jpg
kayak01.jpg
Kayaks in the Charles River, Boston, Mass.
kayak02.jpg
kayak02.jpg
Kayak in the Charles River, Boston, Mass.

 

Books about Kayaks
kayak03.jpg
kayak03.jpg
Kayaks at Lake Placid, NY
kayak04.jpg
kayak04.jpg
Kayak training at Lake Placid, New York, USA
kayak05.jpg
kayak05.jpg
Kayak at Lake Placid, NY
kayak06.jpg
kayak06.jpg
Kayaks convention at Lake Placid, NY
kayak07.jpg
kayak07.jpg
Learning to Kayak at Lake Placid, NY
kayak08.jpg
kayak08.jpg
Kayaks on the Barge Canal, Merritt Island, Florida, USA
kayak09.jpg
kayak09.jpg
Kayaks on shore at Orcas Island, Puget Sound, Washington
kayak10.jpg
kayak10.jpg
Kayak in the Potomac River, Great Falls, Virginia
kayak11.jpg
kayak11.jpg
Kayak in the Potomac River, Great Falls, Virginia
See All Free Photos











Visit http://www.TechnologySite.org for free photos and lists of inventions and technology. Visit http://www.ClimateChangeFacts.info for unbiased information about climate change. Visit http://www.ClimateCooling.org for eye-opening biased information on global cooling and climate change and visit http://www.OceanAssoc.com for fisheries and oceans consulting services.

This page last updated or reviewed in August 2014