Acllahuasi at Pachacamac, south of Lima, Peru.

Here in Incan times, 1440 - 1533, specially selected women were trained for various occupations. The younger girls were called Acllas, which means "chosen women". They would be selected and taken to the provincial capitals to the houses of the Mamacunas. It appears these were in essence the "University of Idolatry" attested to by the earliest Catholic missionaries. "Here these girls learned the things pertaining to their religion, its rites and ceremonies as well as occupations that correspond to women and that are necessary to human life. They were also taught how to spin and weave clothing of wool, cotton, and vicuna which was very fine and delicate, of excellent quality, and in a variety of very bright colors. The most revered class of women was that of the Guayrur Aclla, or Mamacunas. These women were housed separately from the other Aclla and only came into contact with them during shared meals. These women, who were dedicated to the Sun, had to be of pure Incan blood. Even though beauty was an important prerequisite to selection into the ranks of the most sacred, their bloodline was of paramount importance. Those with any foreign blood or any question as to their parentage were excluded from the Mamacunas. These women remained chaste for their entire lives dedicating themselves to the service of the Gods they served. Anyone attempting to harm or violate a Mamacuna was sentenced to death, along with his family and neighbors and all their livestock. (Source and to see more)
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This page last updated August 2014